Theses. Existing UTAUT research offers support for age as a moderator

Theses. Existing UTAUT research offers support for age as a moderator in technology adoption, more so than for gender and user experience. Khechine, Lakhal, Pascot, Bytha (2014) found that age moderated the acceptance of a webinar system in a blended learning course, while gender did not. However, age distribution was limited in this study, with almost 80 of the sample between ages 19 and 23, only 10.5 older than 30, and the entire sample onlyAuthor Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Pageranging from 19?5 years old. Further, due to the nature of the study (within the context of undergraduate education), distribution of technology literacy was also likely limited, as almost 94 of the sample had at least four years experience with computers. Despite these limitations, the study JC-1 structure discovered that younger students (aged 19?4) demonstrated more LY317615 site concern for performance expectancy, whereas older students (aged 25?5) demonstrated more concern for facilitating conditions. Zaremohzzabieh, Samah, Omar, Bolong, and Shaffril (2014) found that age moderated the effect of overall UTAUT determinants on fisherman’s ICT adoption in Malaysia, whereas experience only moderated performance expectancy and effort expectancy determinants bearing on intention. Lian and Yen (2014) conducted a study on the moderating effects of age and gender on adopting online shopping in Taiwan. Lian and Yen (2014) examined UTAUT in the context of five barriers: usage, value, risk, tradition, and image. They sampled two groups, younger adults (ages 20?5, sampled from students in Taiwanese universities) and older adults (50?75, sampled from students completing computer classes for seniors). They found that older adults (aged over 50) experienced additional barriers of risk and tradition to online shopping than younger adults (aged under 20), whereas the moderating effect of gender was not very significant. Lian and Yen (2014) also found that older adult consumers were more likely to perceive the risk of adopting a new service as high because the information technology literacy of older adults is generally lower than that of younger users. Also, older adults were more likely to have a relatively higher tradition barrier than the younger generations because older adults were generally more familiar with traditional physical store service than with the virtual store service. Based on the findings, this study concluded that the additional barriers older adults experience lead to a decrease in the older adults’ intention to shop online. Pan and Jordan-Marsh (2010) examined the moderating effects of age and gender on Chinese older adults’ decisions to adopt the Internet. They found that age but not gender significantly moderated intention such that age difference between two groups of older adults (aged 50?0 and aged above 60) negatively affected intention to use and adopt the Internet. However, Pan and Jordan-Marsh (2010) discovered that the moderating effect of age became non-significant when the four key determinants (perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norm, and facilitating conditions) were added to the predictive model. Thus, they inferred that age indirectly moderates Internet use intention and actual adoption, and it may be mediated by other predictors. Pan and Jordan-Marsh (2010) also noted that older adults can be physically and.Theses. Existing UTAUT research offers support for age as a moderator in technology adoption, more so than for gender and user experience. Khechine, Lakhal, Pascot, Bytha (2014) found that age moderated the acceptance of a webinar system in a blended learning course, while gender did not. However, age distribution was limited in this study, with almost 80 of the sample between ages 19 and 23, only 10.5 older than 30, and the entire sample onlyAuthor Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Pageranging from 19?5 years old. Further, due to the nature of the study (within the context of undergraduate education), distribution of technology literacy was also likely limited, as almost 94 of the sample had at least four years experience with computers. Despite these limitations, the study discovered that younger students (aged 19?4) demonstrated more concern for performance expectancy, whereas older students (aged 25?5) demonstrated more concern for facilitating conditions. Zaremohzzabieh, Samah, Omar, Bolong, and Shaffril (2014) found that age moderated the effect of overall UTAUT determinants on fisherman’s ICT adoption in Malaysia, whereas experience only moderated performance expectancy and effort expectancy determinants bearing on intention. Lian and Yen (2014) conducted a study on the moderating effects of age and gender on adopting online shopping in Taiwan. Lian and Yen (2014) examined UTAUT in the context of five barriers: usage, value, risk, tradition, and image. They sampled two groups, younger adults (ages 20?5, sampled from students in Taiwanese universities) and older adults (50?75, sampled from students completing computer classes for seniors). They found that older adults (aged over 50) experienced additional barriers of risk and tradition to online shopping than younger adults (aged under 20), whereas the moderating effect of gender was not very significant. Lian and Yen (2014) also found that older adult consumers were more likely to perceive the risk of adopting a new service as high because the information technology literacy of older adults is generally lower than that of younger users. Also, older adults were more likely to have a relatively higher tradition barrier than the younger generations because older adults were generally more familiar with traditional physical store service than with the virtual store service. Based on the findings, this study concluded that the additional barriers older adults experience lead to a decrease in the older adults’ intention to shop online. Pan and Jordan-Marsh (2010) examined the moderating effects of age and gender on Chinese older adults’ decisions to adopt the Internet. They found that age but not gender significantly moderated intention such that age difference between two groups of older adults (aged 50?0 and aged above 60) negatively affected intention to use and adopt the Internet. However, Pan and Jordan-Marsh (2010) discovered that the moderating effect of age became non-significant when the four key determinants (perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norm, and facilitating conditions) were added to the predictive model. Thus, they inferred that age indirectly moderates Internet use intention and actual adoption, and it may be mediated by other predictors. Pan and Jordan-Marsh (2010) also noted that older adults can be physically and.

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