Ic of complaining, it is not only coming from the curmudgeonly

Ic of complaining, it is not only coming from the curmudgeonly senior faculty member. Some days negativity comes from all directions. As a mentor it is essential to protect trainees|TOXICOLOGICAL SCIENCES, 2015, Vol. 145, No.cutting-edge approaches. Look for those courses that expand your skill set. The word toxicology doesn’t need to be in the title, in fact it is probably better if it isn’t. Twenty years ago I attended a workshop on differential display. This was the cutting-edge way to measure the differences in mRNA expression between 2 samples. Within 6 months the technique was obsolete due to the invention of the microarray. I didn’t feel as if I had wasted my time, in fact, I was acutely aware of how much better this new technique was than the one I had just learned. One only needs to look at the Tox21 initiative to see how the field is changing. NIH is now using robotic RG7800 cancer screening of thousands of compounds to look for their toxic effects. How many trainees are being equipped to interface with these approaches of the future? Are your getting experience with developing assays and scaling them up to 384 or 1536? Are you looking at these results as you conduct appropriate mechanistic follow up in more complex systems? Are you learning about the computational and systems biology approaches to develop the models needed to interpret the data? For the most part, your mentors don’t have this expertise. Many of us typed our dissertations on an actual typewriter, or for those slightly younger we may have printed using dot matrix printer. Big data are a relatively new concept and one that few mentors have the appropriate expertise. One must seek out opportunities to learn these new approaches and tools. Results from these approaches complement basic laboratory research as they have their foundation in biological mechanisms of toxicity.noble pursuit. Once you forget this, it is nearly impossible to tolerate the often oppressive failure that you will face in your daily life as a scientist. Those that retain their enthusiasm for the science are much more resilient, and ultimately more successful. Many of your colleagues will be facing personal crises in the upcoming years. There are fewer jobs in all sectors, but that doesn’t mean the entire field is in crisis mode. Science will likely experience some transformative change in the coming years, but we will always need scientists with expertise in toxicology. Be one of those scientists.CLOSING THOUGHTSWhile there may be an impending crisis facing young investigators in toxicology and science in general, I believe that it can be averted if the field and the trainees themselves take some deliberate steps to do so. Our training programs must proactively embrace big data and bioinformatics. We must close the gap between cutting-edge science and our research endeavors. Our trainees should be demanding this knowledge and our training programs should be delivering. If we give into the general pessimism in biomedical sciences and continue to discourage our trainees we will indeed have a full-blown crisis. I am afraid that we are creating a system that is discouraging the superstars who will be essential for our future survival as a discipline. Losing this type of MK-571 (sodium salt) price investigator to other fields would be tragic. We need to emphasize that toxicology has more to offer than many other subdisciplines in biomedical sciences. Career options beyond the professorate have always been part of toxicology. Toxicology ha.Ic of complaining, it is not only coming from the curmudgeonly senior faculty member. Some days negativity comes from all directions. As a mentor it is essential to protect trainees|TOXICOLOGICAL SCIENCES, 2015, Vol. 145, No.cutting-edge approaches. Look for those courses that expand your skill set. The word toxicology doesn’t need to be in the title, in fact it is probably better if it isn’t. Twenty years ago I attended a workshop on differential display. This was the cutting-edge way to measure the differences in mRNA expression between 2 samples. Within 6 months the technique was obsolete due to the invention of the microarray. I didn’t feel as if I had wasted my time, in fact, I was acutely aware of how much better this new technique was than the one I had just learned. One only needs to look at the Tox21 initiative to see how the field is changing. NIH is now using robotic screening of thousands of compounds to look for their toxic effects. How many trainees are being equipped to interface with these approaches of the future? Are your getting experience with developing assays and scaling them up to 384 or 1536? Are you looking at these results as you conduct appropriate mechanistic follow up in more complex systems? Are you learning about the computational and systems biology approaches to develop the models needed to interpret the data? For the most part, your mentors don’t have this expertise. Many of us typed our dissertations on an actual typewriter, or for those slightly younger we may have printed using dot matrix printer. Big data are a relatively new concept and one that few mentors have the appropriate expertise. One must seek out opportunities to learn these new approaches and tools. Results from these approaches complement basic laboratory research as they have their foundation in biological mechanisms of toxicity.noble pursuit. Once you forget this, it is nearly impossible to tolerate the often oppressive failure that you will face in your daily life as a scientist. Those that retain their enthusiasm for the science are much more resilient, and ultimately more successful. Many of your colleagues will be facing personal crises in the upcoming years. There are fewer jobs in all sectors, but that doesn’t mean the entire field is in crisis mode. Science will likely experience some transformative change in the coming years, but we will always need scientists with expertise in toxicology. Be one of those scientists.CLOSING THOUGHTSWhile there may be an impending crisis facing young investigators in toxicology and science in general, I believe that it can be averted if the field and the trainees themselves take some deliberate steps to do so. Our training programs must proactively embrace big data and bioinformatics. We must close the gap between cutting-edge science and our research endeavors. Our trainees should be demanding this knowledge and our training programs should be delivering. If we give into the general pessimism in biomedical sciences and continue to discourage our trainees we will indeed have a full-blown crisis. I am afraid that we are creating a system that is discouraging the superstars who will be essential for our future survival as a discipline. Losing this type of investigator to other fields would be tragic. We need to emphasize that toxicology has more to offer than many other subdisciplines in biomedical sciences. Career options beyond the professorate have always been part of toxicology. Toxicology ha.

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