). For behavioral intention, ANOVA results indicated a significant difference, F(3, 823)=39.68, p

). For behavioral intention, ANOVA results indicated a significant difference, F(3, 823)=39.68, p=.000, across the four generations. GenX reported the highest level of behavioral intention (M=4.37, SD=.74), followed by GenY (M=4.30, SD=.77), BoomersAuthor Lasalocid (sodium) side effects Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Page(M=4.14, SD=.88), and Builders (M=3.18, SD=1.32). Only Builders were significantly different from all other generational groups (see Table 3 for details). We also conducted a MANCOVA controlling for participants weekly hours of tablet use with generational group (Builder, Boomer, Generation X, Generation Y) as the independent variable and performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, and tablet use intention as the dependent variables. There was a main effect for generational differences (F(15,2361) = 12.63, p < .001; Pillai's Trace). Between-subjects effects revealed significant differences between generational groups for all but one determinant: Performance Sodium lasalocid biological activity expectancy ((F(3,789) = 9.60, p < .001), Effort Expectancy ((F(3,789) = 48.37, p < .001), Facilitating Conditions ((F(3,789) = 19.93, p < .001), and Intention ((F(3,789) = 37.93, p < .001). Social Influence was not significant ((F(3,789) = 2.26, p = .08), however, the observed power for this determinant was .57, compared to 1.00 for all other determinants. The generational mean differences within determinants were similar in strength to those found in the ANOVAs (see Table 4), with two exceptions. First, in effort expectancy, the difference between Boomers and Generation X changed from p < . 01 to p = .012. Second, the ANOVA reveal significant differences between Builders and all other generational groups for social influence, but there were no significant mean differences between generational groups for social influence in the MANCOVA, which was underpowered (see Table 4 for details). 4.2. Prediction of Behavioral Intention to Use Tablets Another goal of this study was to explore how UTAUT determinants predict tablet intentions. The research question seeks to understand how the formation of anticipated behavioral intention is affected by performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, and facilitating conditions. We used a stepwise regression analysis with moderators age, gender, experience of tablet use (“Have you ever used a tablet” y/n), and hours of tablet use in the first block, and the UTAUT subscales (performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence) traditionally noted as the three predictors of use intention in the second block. The results of this regressions are presented in Table 5. In the first block where control variables entered (Adj. R2 = .13, F(4,750) = 27.98, p < .001), age negatively (= -.18, t = -4.99, p < .001) and experience of tablet use positively ( = .26, t = 6.79, p < .001) predicted anticipated behavioral intention. Gender ( = .07, t = 1.90, p = . 06) and hours of tablet use ( = -.05, t = -1.27, p = .20) were included in the first block as controls, but were not significant. The addition of the second block resulted with a significant change, R2 change = .11, F(5,749) = 48.35, p < .001, where only effort expectancy entered the model and positively ( = .42, t = 10.64, p < .001) predicted intention to use a tablet in the next three months. In the final model, age negatively, g.). For behavioral intention, ANOVA results indicated a significant difference, F(3, 823)=39.68, p=.000, across the four generations. GenX reported the highest level of behavioral intention (M=4.37, SD=.74), followed by GenY (M=4.30, SD=.77), BoomersAuthor Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Page(M=4.14, SD=.88), and Builders (M=3.18, SD=1.32). Only Builders were significantly different from all other generational groups (see Table 3 for details). We also conducted a MANCOVA controlling for participants weekly hours of tablet use with generational group (Builder, Boomer, Generation X, Generation Y) as the independent variable and performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, and tablet use intention as the dependent variables. There was a main effect for generational differences (F(15,2361) = 12.63, p < .001; Pillai’s Trace). Between-subjects effects revealed significant differences between generational groups for all but one determinant: Performance Expectancy ((F(3,789) = 9.60, p < .001), Effort Expectancy ((F(3,789) = 48.37, p < .001), Facilitating Conditions ((F(3,789) = 19.93, p < .001), and Intention ((F(3,789) = 37.93, p < .001). Social Influence was not significant ((F(3,789) = 2.26, p = .08), however, the observed power for this determinant was .57, compared to 1.00 for all other determinants. The generational mean differences within determinants were similar in strength to those found in the ANOVAs (see Table 4), with two exceptions. First, in effort expectancy, the difference between Boomers and Generation X changed from p < . 01 to p = .012. Second, the ANOVA reveal significant differences between Builders and all other generational groups for social influence, but there were no significant mean differences between generational groups for social influence in the MANCOVA, which was underpowered (see Table 4 for details). 4.2. Prediction of Behavioral Intention to Use Tablets Another goal of this study was to explore how UTAUT determinants predict tablet intentions. The research question seeks to understand how the formation of anticipated behavioral intention is affected by performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, and facilitating conditions. We used a stepwise regression analysis with moderators age, gender, experience of tablet use (“Have you ever used a tablet” y/n), and hours of tablet use in the first block, and the UTAUT subscales (performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and social influence) traditionally noted as the three predictors of use intention in the second block. The results of this regressions are presented in Table 5. In the first block where control variables entered (Adj. R2 = .13, F(4,750) = 27.98, p < .001), age negatively (= -.18, t = -4.99, p < .001) and experience of tablet use positively ( = .26, t = 6.79, p < .001) predicted anticipated behavioral intention. Gender ( = .07, t = 1.90, p = . 06) and hours of tablet use ( = -.05, t = -1.27, p = .20) were included in the first block as controls, but were not significant. The addition of the second block resulted with a significant change, R2 change = .11, F(5,749) = 48.35, p < .001, where only effort expectancy entered the model and positively ( = .42, t = 10.64, p < .001) predicted intention to use a tablet in the next three months. In the final model, age negatively, g.

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