Important to determine at a general level but also at the

Important to determine at a general level but also at the level of each individual how long it takes before changes instantiated by remediation can maintain in natural environments, which often include variable and perhaps unreliable reinforcement schedules. With smaller and lower-cost eye tracking research technologies such a research goal might be feasible.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptGeneral SummaryWe have argued that overselective attention is quite likely to be a currently underappreciated barrier to functional use of AAC by at least some individuals. We have sought to illustrate some of the ways that overselective attention may be relevant to AAC intervention practice and offered evidence-based methods for assessing overselective attention and potentially intervening when it occurs. A productive line of future research targeting issues specific to AAC is outlined, although it is by no means exhaustive. With further advances both in eye tracking research technologies and in the understanding of overselectivity within AAC, it may be possible to mitigate barriers introduced by overselective attention and promote more effective functional communication.Augment Altern Commun. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 June 01.Dube and WilkinsonPageAcknowledgmentsPreparation of this paper was supported in part by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grants P01HD025995 and R01HD062582, and Isovaleryl-Val-Val-Sta-Ala-Sta-OH biological activity P30HD04147. We thank Dr. Christophe Gerard for his comments.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript
Most deaths across nations (including low and middle income countries) are now due to chronic disease and the proportion of worldwide mortality from chronic age-associated disease is projected to escalate further, reaching 66 per cent in 2030 (World Health Organization, 2005). This global increase in disease burden from cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and other chronic age-associated diseases reflects social and economic changes, including lifestyle and diet, as well as population aging. Although the world-wide increase in life expectancy (at birth) is among the world`s greatest achievements, the potential socioeconomic costs of a higher chronic disease burden rise sharply with an aging society. The good news is that mounting evidence suggests effective public health policies and programs can do much to mitigate this risk and help people remain healthy as they age. Reflecting this untapped potential for preventive public health efforts, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have estimated that 80 percent of coronary heart disease (CHD) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as well as 40 percent of cancers, could be prevented by improving three health behaviors: eating habits, physical activity, and tobacco use (World Health Organization, 2005; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009). Although difficult to quantify, of these three risk factors, dietary habits may have become the most important modifiable risk factor in many nations. Backing up this contention is a recent study that assessed 17 major risk factors and found that composition of the diet constituted the largest 11-Deoxojervine biological activity cluster of risk factors responsible for death (26 ) and the highest percentage of disability-adjusted life years lost (14 ) in the US (US Burden of Disease Collaborators et al. 2013). Becaus.Important to determine at a general level but also at the level of each individual how long it takes before changes instantiated by remediation can maintain in natural environments, which often include variable and perhaps unreliable reinforcement schedules. With smaller and lower-cost eye tracking research technologies such a research goal might be feasible.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptGeneral SummaryWe have argued that overselective attention is quite likely to be a currently underappreciated barrier to functional use of AAC by at least some individuals. We have sought to illustrate some of the ways that overselective attention may be relevant to AAC intervention practice and offered evidence-based methods for assessing overselective attention and potentially intervening when it occurs. A productive line of future research targeting issues specific to AAC is outlined, although it is by no means exhaustive. With further advances both in eye tracking research technologies and in the understanding of overselectivity within AAC, it may be possible to mitigate barriers introduced by overselective attention and promote more effective functional communication.Augment Altern Commun. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 June 01.Dube and WilkinsonPageAcknowledgmentsPreparation of this paper was supported in part by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grants P01HD025995 and R01HD062582, and P30HD04147. We thank Dr. Christophe Gerard for his comments.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript
Most deaths across nations (including low and middle income countries) are now due to chronic disease and the proportion of worldwide mortality from chronic age-associated disease is projected to escalate further, reaching 66 per cent in 2030 (World Health Organization, 2005). This global increase in disease burden from cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and other chronic age-associated diseases reflects social and economic changes, including lifestyle and diet, as well as population aging. Although the world-wide increase in life expectancy (at birth) is among the world`s greatest achievements, the potential socioeconomic costs of a higher chronic disease burden rise sharply with an aging society. The good news is that mounting evidence suggests effective public health policies and programs can do much to mitigate this risk and help people remain healthy as they age. Reflecting this untapped potential for preventive public health efforts, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have estimated that 80 percent of coronary heart disease (CHD) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as well as 40 percent of cancers, could be prevented by improving three health behaviors: eating habits, physical activity, and tobacco use (World Health Organization, 2005; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009). Although difficult to quantify, of these three risk factors, dietary habits may have become the most important modifiable risk factor in many nations. Backing up this contention is a recent study that assessed 17 major risk factors and found that composition of the diet constituted the largest cluster of risk factors responsible for death (26 ) and the highest percentage of disability-adjusted life years lost (14 ) in the US (US Burden of Disease Collaborators et al. 2013). Becaus.

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