Ender positively, experience of tablet use positively, hours of table use

Ender positively, experience of tablet use positively, hours of table use negatively, and effort expectancy positively predicted 24 of the variance in tablet use intention. Performance expectancy and social influence were not significant in the final model (see Table 5 for details).Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.PageFacilitating conditions do not directly predict intention in Venkatesh et al.’s (2003) model, but instead predict use behavior. Nevertheless, because some existing research tests this association, we executed a LY317615MedChemExpress LY317615 stepwise regression identical to the first only with the addition of facilitating conditions in the second block to explore how facilitating conditions may contribute to tablet use intentions. The BMS-214662MedChemExpress BMS-214662 results of this regressions are presented in Table 6. In the first block where control variables entered (Adj. R2 = .13, F(4,747) = 27.82, p < .001), age negatively (= -.18, t = -4.99, p < .001) and experience of tablet use positively ( = .26, t = 6.76, p < .001) predicted anticipated behavioral intention. Gender ( = .07, t = 1.94, p = . 05) and hours of tablet use ( = -.05, t = -1.27, p = .21) were included in the first block as controls, but were not significant. The addition of the second block resulted with a significant change, R2 change = .11, F(5,746) = 48.11, p < .001, where effort expectancy entered the model and positively ( = .42, t = 10.61, p < .001) predicted intention. Facilitating conditions entered on the third block (R2 change = .01, F(6,745) = 41.56, p < . 001; = .13, t = 2.63, p < .05). In the final model, age negatively, gender positively, experience of tablet use positively, hours of tablet use negatively, effort expectancy positively, and facilitating conditions positively predicted 25 of the variance in tablet use intention. Performance expectancy and social influence were not significant in the final model (see Table 6 for details).Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript4. DiscussionThis study indicated generational differences within tablet use and predictive power of each of the key determinants from the theory of UTAUT for behavioral intentions to use tablets. In doing so, this study suggests that the theory of UTAUT can be utilized to better understand generational differences within the context of new technology adoption. The discussion section focuses on generational differences and tablet use/intention, why effort expectancy is the most influential to use behavior of tablets, and facilitating conditions among groups. Age consistently emerges as a significant moderator in UTAUT research. One major contribution of this study is that it tests UTAUT in a sample that is diverse in both age and user experience. Previous research has been limited in both age distribution and user experience. For example, almost 80 of Khechine et al.’s (2014) sample was between 19 and 23, with the full range between 19?5, and likely technology literate (94 having at least four years experience with computers). Over 90 of Kaba and Tour?(2014)’s sample was under 28 years old and about half had been using the Internet for at least four years. Lian and Yen (2014) sampled two groups aged 20?5 and 50?5 who were completing computer classes. Pan and Jordan-Marsh’s (2010) sample was over 50 years old. By comparison, our sample ranged from 19?9 years old, wi.Ender positively, experience of tablet use positively, hours of table use negatively, and effort expectancy positively predicted 24 of the variance in tablet use intention. Performance expectancy and social influence were not significant in the final model (see Table 5 for details).Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.PageFacilitating conditions do not directly predict intention in Venkatesh et al.’s (2003) model, but instead predict use behavior. Nevertheless, because some existing research tests this association, we executed a stepwise regression identical to the first only with the addition of facilitating conditions in the second block to explore how facilitating conditions may contribute to tablet use intentions. The results of this regressions are presented in Table 6. In the first block where control variables entered (Adj. R2 = .13, F(4,747) = 27.82, p < .001), age negatively (= -.18, t = -4.99, p < .001) and experience of tablet use positively ( = .26, t = 6.76, p < .001) predicted anticipated behavioral intention. Gender ( = .07, t = 1.94, p = . 05) and hours of tablet use ( = -.05, t = -1.27, p = .21) were included in the first block as controls, but were not significant. The addition of the second block resulted with a significant change, R2 change = .11, F(5,746) = 48.11, p < .001, where effort expectancy entered the model and positively ( = .42, t = 10.61, p < .001) predicted intention. Facilitating conditions entered on the third block (R2 change = .01, F(6,745) = 41.56, p < . 001; = .13, t = 2.63, p < .05). In the final model, age negatively, gender positively, experience of tablet use positively, hours of tablet use negatively, effort expectancy positively, and facilitating conditions positively predicted 25 of the variance in tablet use intention. Performance expectancy and social influence were not significant in the final model (see Table 6 for details).Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript4. DiscussionThis study indicated generational differences within tablet use and predictive power of each of the key determinants from the theory of UTAUT for behavioral intentions to use tablets. In doing so, this study suggests that the theory of UTAUT can be utilized to better understand generational differences within the context of new technology adoption. The discussion section focuses on generational differences and tablet use/intention, why effort expectancy is the most influential to use behavior of tablets, and facilitating conditions among groups. Age consistently emerges as a significant moderator in UTAUT research. One major contribution of this study is that it tests UTAUT in a sample that is diverse in both age and user experience. Previous research has been limited in both age distribution and user experience. For example, almost 80 of Khechine et al.’s (2014) sample was between 19 and 23, with the full range between 19?5, and likely technology literate (94 having at least four years experience with computers). Over 90 of Kaba and Tour?(2014)’s sample was under 28 years old and about half had been using the Internet for at least four years. Lian and Yen (2014) sampled two groups aged 20?5 and 50?5 who were completing computer classes. Pan and Jordan-Marsh’s (2010) sample was over 50 years old. By comparison, our sample ranged from 19?9 years old, wi.

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