S roles in basic science, pharmaceutical science, regulatory affairs, environmental health

S roles in basic science, pharmaceutical science, regulatory affairs, environmental health, health care, consumer products, emerging technologies, and the list goes on. We can use the scientific and professional diversity of our field to our advantage. We can give our young investigators an immediate advantage by continuing to make toxicology relevant, but the trainees must be equipped for competition. We need to step up our recruitment and training of those trainees who we have identified as having the potential to lead toxicology into the future. Finally, to mentors and trainees- don’t let toxicology be mediocre. Aiming for greatness is the best strategy to avert crisis in the field, young and old alike.3. Gather information on your field from scholarly sourcesDon’t ignore reality. Trainees should be cognizant of how the biomedical landscape is changing, but they should gain this information from accurate sources and not base their scientific mindset on conjecture or water cooler complaining. When you want to learn about a new protein you go to reliable sources that are focused on data. So to for learning about the challenges facing your field. President Daniels’ article is an example of the thoughtful type of analysis that trainees should be reading. To the young investigator, my advice is simple. Learn about the changes that are occurring in science, but stop listening to the naysayers. They have experienced unwelcomed change during their career. It has jaded them. Refuse to participate in their negativity.ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe author would like to thank Dr Matthew Campen, Dr Rory Conolly, Dr Patricia Ganey, Dr Peter Goering, Dr Douglas Keller, and Dr Patti Miller for their helpful comments.4. Nourish your scientific curiosityTrainees are continually VP 63843 web juggling their responsibilities set by their mentors and programs. From laboratory meetings, graduate program deadlines, committee meetings, comprehensive exams, to tedium in the laboratory the tasks can feel daunting. These day-to-day activities involved in research can lead to a myopic view of the process. Trainees must learn to take a step back to view the big picture of science. Watch the acceptance speeches of Nobel laureates (certainly more important that acceptance speeches at the Oscars). Read biographies of great scientists. Let yourself get caught up in the excitement of research. It is essential to continue to remember why you entered RG7800 web Science in the first place. Science has been and will continue to be a
doi:10.1093/scan/nssSCAN (2014) 9, 297^Deconstructing the brains moral network: dissociable functionality between the temporoparietal junction and ventro-medial prefrontal cortexOriel FeldmanHall,1,2 Dean Mobbs,1 and Tim DalgleishMedical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK and 2Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1TP, UKResearch has illustrated that the brain regions implicated in moral cognition comprise a robust and broadly distributed network. However, understanding how these brain regions interact and give rise to the complex interplay of cognitive processes underpinning human moral cognition is still in its infancy. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine patterns of activation for difficult and easy moral decisions relative to matched non-moral comparators. This revealed an activation pattern consistent with a relative functional double dissociation between the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventro.S roles in basic science, pharmaceutical science, regulatory affairs, environmental health, health care, consumer products, emerging technologies, and the list goes on. We can use the scientific and professional diversity of our field to our advantage. We can give our young investigators an immediate advantage by continuing to make toxicology relevant, but the trainees must be equipped for competition. We need to step up our recruitment and training of those trainees who we have identified as having the potential to lead toxicology into the future. Finally, to mentors and trainees- don’t let toxicology be mediocre. Aiming for greatness is the best strategy to avert crisis in the field, young and old alike.3. Gather information on your field from scholarly sourcesDon’t ignore reality. Trainees should be cognizant of how the biomedical landscape is changing, but they should gain this information from accurate sources and not base their scientific mindset on conjecture or water cooler complaining. When you want to learn about a new protein you go to reliable sources that are focused on data. So to for learning about the challenges facing your field. President Daniels’ article is an example of the thoughtful type of analysis that trainees should be reading. To the young investigator, my advice is simple. Learn about the changes that are occurring in science, but stop listening to the naysayers. They have experienced unwelcomed change during their career. It has jaded them. Refuse to participate in their negativity.ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe author would like to thank Dr Matthew Campen, Dr Rory Conolly, Dr Patricia Ganey, Dr Peter Goering, Dr Douglas Keller, and Dr Patti Miller for their helpful comments.4. Nourish your scientific curiosityTrainees are continually juggling their responsibilities set by their mentors and programs. From laboratory meetings, graduate program deadlines, committee meetings, comprehensive exams, to tedium in the laboratory the tasks can feel daunting. These day-to-day activities involved in research can lead to a myopic view of the process. Trainees must learn to take a step back to view the big picture of science. Watch the acceptance speeches of Nobel laureates (certainly more important that acceptance speeches at the Oscars). Read biographies of great scientists. Let yourself get caught up in the excitement of research. It is essential to continue to remember why you entered science in the first place. Science has been and will continue to be a
doi:10.1093/scan/nssSCAN (2014) 9, 297^Deconstructing the brains moral network: dissociable functionality between the temporoparietal junction and ventro-medial prefrontal cortexOriel FeldmanHall,1,2 Dean Mobbs,1 and Tim DalgleishMedical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK and 2Cambridge University, Cambridge CB2 1TP, UKResearch has illustrated that the brain regions implicated in moral cognition comprise a robust and broadly distributed network. However, understanding how these brain regions interact and give rise to the complex interplay of cognitive processes underpinning human moral cognition is still in its infancy. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine patterns of activation for difficult and easy moral decisions relative to matched non-moral comparators. This revealed an activation pattern consistent with a relative functional double dissociation between the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and ventro.

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