Sures of politicized group identity. We therefore hypothesize that the Asian

Sures of politicized group identity. We therefore hypothesize that the Asian American and non-Hispanic White communities will prove to show distinct patterns from those of Latinos and African Americans.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptDistinction between Linked Fate and Group ConsciousnessThe final theory that we test in our analysis is whether the concepts of linked fate and group consciousness are in fact distinct or if they can be used as surrogates for one another. This aspect of our analysis is again motivated largely by the contention of McClain et al. (2009) that scholars in this area have not utilized enough discretion in how they treat these two aspects of group identity. More specifically, McClain et al. (2009) suggest that that some scholars have used linked fate as “a sophisticated and parsimonious alternative” to the operationalization of racial group consciousness (pg. 477). Given the complexities associated with the measurement of the multi-dimensional concept of group consciousness outlined here, we can sympathize with the desire to find a single measure to capture what is assumed to be the same construct. In short, we attempt to test this assumption by exploring whether linked fate and group consciousness are in fact interchangeable or if they are interconnected but empirically distinct concepts. Given the complexity of group identity, madePolit Res Q. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 March 01.Sanchez and VargasPageup of multiple intersecting and interacting dimensions, we anticipate that the onedimensional concept of linked fate will not be a SC144 web sufficient substitute for the multidimensional concept of group consciousness. Our results should provide some helpful insights for scholars working in this area to follow when operationalizing these important concepts.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptData and MethodsTo better understand the dimensions of group consciousness across racial and ethnic groups we make use of the 2004 National Politics Study (Jackson et al. 2004). The NPS collected a total of 3,339 interviews using computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) from September 2004 to February 2005. The NPS collected data on individuals’ political attitudes; beliefs, aspirations, behaviors, as well as items that tap into the dimensions of group consciousness, linked fate, government policy, and party affiliation. The NPS sample consist of 756 African Americans, 919 non-Hispanic Whites, 757 Hispanics, 503 Asians, and 404 Caribbean’s. NPS is unique in that it has a relatively large racial and ethnic group sample with various measures of group consciousness and linked fate, and as the principal investigator’s state, provide the unique opportunity to make direct comparisons across multiple groups: “to our knowledge, this is the first nationally representative, explicitly comparative, simultaneous study of all these ethnic and racial groups.” 2 The primary survey items this analysis uses include group commonality, order UNC0642 perceived discrimination, collective action, and linked fate. The first step in this analysis is to summarize and rank each racial and ethnic group by the four items, followed by a series of means differences test for each racial and ethnic group. All means difference test were conducted with a chi-square test, as the chi-square allows us to use categorical variables. The second step in this analysis is to perform a series of princip.Sures of politicized group identity. We therefore hypothesize that the Asian American and non-Hispanic White communities will prove to show distinct patterns from those of Latinos and African Americans.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptDistinction between Linked Fate and Group ConsciousnessThe final theory that we test in our analysis is whether the concepts of linked fate and group consciousness are in fact distinct or if they can be used as surrogates for one another. This aspect of our analysis is again motivated largely by the contention of McClain et al. (2009) that scholars in this area have not utilized enough discretion in how they treat these two aspects of group identity. More specifically, McClain et al. (2009) suggest that that some scholars have used linked fate as “a sophisticated and parsimonious alternative” to the operationalization of racial group consciousness (pg. 477). Given the complexities associated with the measurement of the multi-dimensional concept of group consciousness outlined here, we can sympathize with the desire to find a single measure to capture what is assumed to be the same construct. In short, we attempt to test this assumption by exploring whether linked fate and group consciousness are in fact interchangeable or if they are interconnected but empirically distinct concepts. Given the complexity of group identity, madePolit Res Q. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 March 01.Sanchez and VargasPageup of multiple intersecting and interacting dimensions, we anticipate that the onedimensional concept of linked fate will not be a sufficient substitute for the multidimensional concept of group consciousness. Our results should provide some helpful insights for scholars working in this area to follow when operationalizing these important concepts.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptData and MethodsTo better understand the dimensions of group consciousness across racial and ethnic groups we make use of the 2004 National Politics Study (Jackson et al. 2004). The NPS collected a total of 3,339 interviews using computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI) from September 2004 to February 2005. The NPS collected data on individuals’ political attitudes; beliefs, aspirations, behaviors, as well as items that tap into the dimensions of group consciousness, linked fate, government policy, and party affiliation. The NPS sample consist of 756 African Americans, 919 non-Hispanic Whites, 757 Hispanics, 503 Asians, and 404 Caribbean’s. NPS is unique in that it has a relatively large racial and ethnic group sample with various measures of group consciousness and linked fate, and as the principal investigator’s state, provide the unique opportunity to make direct comparisons across multiple groups: “to our knowledge, this is the first nationally representative, explicitly comparative, simultaneous study of all these ethnic and racial groups.” 2 The primary survey items this analysis uses include group commonality, perceived discrimination, collective action, and linked fate. The first step in this analysis is to summarize and rank each racial and ethnic group by the four items, followed by a series of means differences test for each racial and ethnic group. All means difference test were conducted with a chi-square test, as the chi-square allows us to use categorical variables. The second step in this analysis is to perform a series of princip.

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