Lysis of reported outcomes. In this respect, the included studies are

Lysis of reported outcomes. In this respect, the included studies are found to be highly variable in terms of: their definition of the outcome measure (adherence rate); the demographic characteristics and other factors they report and analyse; and whether they report demographic characteristics by outcome (adherent versus non adherent groups). Still, while preserving the qualitative focus of our review, the team believes that it would be helpful to “triangulate” the thematic analysis with this quantitative data. Hence, the various factors in our model (Figure 2) are consequently revisited here to corroborate findings from the qualitative synthesis. Although the quantitative data are selective in the Tyrphostin AG 490MedChemExpress AG-490 topics that they specifically address and, particularly, derive from a limited number of included studies, they do provide a mechanism for exploring the robustness of the synthesis [28].Framework for explaining factors influencing IPT adherenceA model adapted and modified from Munro and colleagues represents how factors interact to influence IPT adherence [27]. A key interaction occurs between individual personal beliefs and family and social support factors; where patients’ interactions with family and the wider community, including health workers (relationships with health providers), influence their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about IPT treatment. Socio economic factors are likely to influence individual personal beliefs, especially where patients live far from clinics and have fewer opportunities to bePLOS ONE | www.plosone.orgPersonal characteristicsPersonal factors related to people’s characteristics such as age and sex are believed to have a major influence on their adherence behaviour. Gust and colleagues observed that the case nonadherent group was younger (t = 58.2, P,0.0001), and included aAdherence to Isoniazid Quinagolide (hydrochloride) chemical information Preventive TherapyFigure 2. Conceptual framework of factors affecting adherence to IPT amongst PLWHA. A key interaction occurs between individual personal beliefs and family and social support factors; where patients’ interactions with family and the wider community, including health workers (relationships with health providers), influence their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about IPT treatment. Socio-economic factors are likely to influence individual personal beliefs, especially where patients live far from clinics and have fewer opportunities to be enlightened about the benefits of IPT. Similarly, HIV treatment and related issues affect patients’ response to IPT treatment; where patients are not likely to adhere to IPT treatment if they are not willing or able to disclose their HIV status. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087166.ggreater proportion of men (62(1) = 5.7, P = 0.017), and persons with higher education (62(2) = 3.6, P = 0.170) [20]. Mosimaneotsile et al [22] and Ngamvithayapong et al [24] also found that women were more likely to be adherent than men. Substance use was also associated with poor adherence with Gust et al reporting that “the case non-adherent group … had a greater proportion of…persons who drank alcohol (62(1) = 4.4, P = 0.036) [20]. The quantitative components of the included studies typically focus on demographic factors. Our qualitative synthesis recognises the importance of the interaction of such demographic factors with individual personal beliefs in influencing trends in adherence of patients to treatment regimes [29,30,31].While individual personal beliefs are critical, our int.Lysis of reported outcomes. In this respect, the included studies are found to be highly variable in terms of: their definition of the outcome measure (adherence rate); the demographic characteristics and other factors they report and analyse; and whether they report demographic characteristics by outcome (adherent versus non adherent groups). Still, while preserving the qualitative focus of our review, the team believes that it would be helpful to “triangulate” the thematic analysis with this quantitative data. Hence, the various factors in our model (Figure 2) are consequently revisited here to corroborate findings from the qualitative synthesis. Although the quantitative data are selective in the topics that they specifically address and, particularly, derive from a limited number of included studies, they do provide a mechanism for exploring the robustness of the synthesis [28].Framework for explaining factors influencing IPT adherenceA model adapted and modified from Munro and colleagues represents how factors interact to influence IPT adherence [27]. A key interaction occurs between individual personal beliefs and family and social support factors; where patients’ interactions with family and the wider community, including health workers (relationships with health providers), influence their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about IPT treatment. Socio economic factors are likely to influence individual personal beliefs, especially where patients live far from clinics and have fewer opportunities to bePLOS ONE | www.plosone.orgPersonal characteristicsPersonal factors related to people’s characteristics such as age and sex are believed to have a major influence on their adherence behaviour. Gust and colleagues observed that the case nonadherent group was younger (t = 58.2, P,0.0001), and included aAdherence to Isoniazid Preventive TherapyFigure 2. Conceptual framework of factors affecting adherence to IPT amongst PLWHA. A key interaction occurs between individual personal beliefs and family and social support factors; where patients’ interactions with family and the wider community, including health workers (relationships with health providers), influence their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about IPT treatment. Socio-economic factors are likely to influence individual personal beliefs, especially where patients live far from clinics and have fewer opportunities to be enlightened about the benefits of IPT. Similarly, HIV treatment and related issues affect patients’ response to IPT treatment; where patients are not likely to adhere to IPT treatment if they are not willing or able to disclose their HIV status. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087166.ggreater proportion of men (62(1) = 5.7, P = 0.017), and persons with higher education (62(2) = 3.6, P = 0.170) [20]. Mosimaneotsile et al [22] and Ngamvithayapong et al [24] also found that women were more likely to be adherent than men. Substance use was also associated with poor adherence with Gust et al reporting that “the case non-adherent group … had a greater proportion of…persons who drank alcohol (62(1) = 4.4, P = 0.036) [20]. The quantitative components of the included studies typically focus on demographic factors. Our qualitative synthesis recognises the importance of the interaction of such demographic factors with individual personal beliefs in influencing trends in adherence of patients to treatment regimes [29,30,31].While individual personal beliefs are critical, our int.

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