Validating additional Rorschach indices). In addition to the moderate support for

Validating get RR6 additional Rorschach indices). In addition to the moderate support for the validity of the implicit I-CBP112 site dependency measure, the present study demonstrated the usefulness of implicit dependency in predicting a variety of personality and psychopathology variables theoretically related to interpersonal dependency. Most notably, implicit dependency contributed uniquely to predicting self-reported major depressive episodes, providing support for the measure’s validity and also stressing the importance of examining implicit constructs for the purpose of diagnosis. This research indicates the importance of using both self-report and implicit measures to assess purportedly the same construct. The importance of this practice is likely to be true especially in cases where the construct of interest is considered negative or maladaptive. One of the primary benefits of administering different classes of measures is that instances of discrepancies between self-report and indirect measures become possible. It is clear that the administration of both self-report and implicit dependency measures allowed for a more comprehensive assessment of individuals’ dependency strivings in the present study. What this additional complexity yields is greater specificity in identifying individuals who may have histories of major depression. However, we were unable to elucidate a more definitive interpretation of discrepancies. It was hypothesized that discrepancies were indicative of a defensive process, but this was not borne out in the data. Similarly, it was anticipated that discrepancies may themselves suggest psychopathology, but this was also unsupported in the data. These possible explanations, while not garnering empirical support in the present work, should still be more formally ruled out in future work before being discarded altogether. For instance, it may be the case that in a more heterogeneous clinical sample with a wider range of psychopathology, such links between discrepancies and symptomatology may become more evident. In addition to pursuing further research using the SC-IAT, it will be useful to consider implicit measures of pro-social personality traits. The majority of the research literature focuses exclusively on more negative, maladaptive traits (e.g., shyness, anxiety). Although these lines of inquiry are certainly productive and informative, it also would be fruitful if compared to traits with opposing valence. Finally, the theoretical issue remains of comparing the assessment tools and predictions of social cognitive and psychodynamic researchers. The underpinnings of the two theories’ conceptualizations of unconscious processes are certainly different, but the methods and hypotheses generated are remarkably similar. It would be most interesting to have a direct comparison of Rorschach dependency and implicit dependency to further examine their relationship. Only with that data will we be able to determine whether the measures used by two contrasting theoretical orientations are actually more similar than the theories from which they originated. If this proves to be the case, more intriguing theoretical questions may be raised regarding potential similarities between the theories themselves.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript
Depression is a common psychiatric disorder, affecting approximately 9.9 of the US adult population in a given year (NIMH, 2003). Among the elderly (aged 65+), depression.Validating additional Rorschach indices). In addition to the moderate support for the validity of the implicit dependency measure, the present study demonstrated the usefulness of implicit dependency in predicting a variety of personality and psychopathology variables theoretically related to interpersonal dependency. Most notably, implicit dependency contributed uniquely to predicting self-reported major depressive episodes, providing support for the measure’s validity and also stressing the importance of examining implicit constructs for the purpose of diagnosis. This research indicates the importance of using both self-report and implicit measures to assess purportedly the same construct. The importance of this practice is likely to be true especially in cases where the construct of interest is considered negative or maladaptive. One of the primary benefits of administering different classes of measures is that instances of discrepancies between self-report and indirect measures become possible. It is clear that the administration of both self-report and implicit dependency measures allowed for a more comprehensive assessment of individuals’ dependency strivings in the present study. What this additional complexity yields is greater specificity in identifying individuals who may have histories of major depression. However, we were unable to elucidate a more definitive interpretation of discrepancies. It was hypothesized that discrepancies were indicative of a defensive process, but this was not borne out in the data. Similarly, it was anticipated that discrepancies may themselves suggest psychopathology, but this was also unsupported in the data. These possible explanations, while not garnering empirical support in the present work, should still be more formally ruled out in future work before being discarded altogether. For instance, it may be the case that in a more heterogeneous clinical sample with a wider range of psychopathology, such links between discrepancies and symptomatology may become more evident. In addition to pursuing further research using the SC-IAT, it will be useful to consider implicit measures of pro-social personality traits. The majority of the research literature focuses exclusively on more negative, maladaptive traits (e.g., shyness, anxiety). Although these lines of inquiry are certainly productive and informative, it also would be fruitful if compared to traits with opposing valence. Finally, the theoretical issue remains of comparing the assessment tools and predictions of social cognitive and psychodynamic researchers. The underpinnings of the two theories’ conceptualizations of unconscious processes are certainly different, but the methods and hypotheses generated are remarkably similar. It would be most interesting to have a direct comparison of Rorschach dependency and implicit dependency to further examine their relationship. Only with that data will we be able to determine whether the measures used by two contrasting theoretical orientations are actually more similar than the theories from which they originated. If this proves to be the case, more intriguing theoretical questions may be raised regarding potential similarities between the theories themselves.NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript
Depression is a common psychiatric disorder, affecting approximately 9.9 of the US adult population in a given year (NIMH, 2003). Among the elderly (aged 65+), depression.

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