Licated by the use of open social media to invite participation.

Licated by the use of open social media to invite participation.Author get SB856553 Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptCONCLUSIONOverall, results of this study demonstrate a rich phenomenological experience among clinical librarians, with strong emotional reactions illustrating both the joys and the challenges of integration into bedside medical care. The data indicates that the emotional experience of an individual librarian significantly impacts on that librarian’s ability to function effectively in the clinical setting, that training for clinical librarians must address these issues, and that such training must also include specialized subjects and skills. These include medical terminology, but also the clinical culture, politics, and environment. Confidence and attitude can be fostered by effective training and preparation, positive mentoring, and clinical champions (advocates) who provide support during the adjustment MG-132 biological activity period. Such preparation and continued on-the-job support can provide valuable assistance in coping successfully with an environment that is often highly stressful and involves lifeand-death situations.AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to thank Kathy Moeller, Kathryn Summey, Colleen Kenefick, Robert Tolliver, and Nita Ferree for their contributions and assistance with this study and manuscript. Also, we would like to thank the Research Committee of the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association for their grant funding support of this project. This study was granted expedited approval by the University of Florida Institutional Review Board, protocol #2010-U-1251. This study was supported in part by the NIH/NCATS Clinical and Translational Science Award to the University of Florida, UL1 TR000064. This study was funded in part by the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association Research Section Award, 2011?012.Med Ref Serv Q. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 January 28.Lyon et al.Page
Case Study: Ethical Guidance for Pediatric e-health Research Using Examples From Pain Research With AdolescentsEllen M. Henderson,1 MSC, Emily F. Law,2 PHD, Tonya M. Palermo,2,3 PHD, and Christopher Eccleston,1 PHDCentre for Pain Research, The University of Bath, 2Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and 3University ofWashington School of MedicineAll correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Prof. Christopher Eccleston, Centre for Pain Research, The University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK. E-mail: [email protected] Received February 15, 2012; revisions received May 30, 2012; accepted June 8, 2012 Objective The Internet is a frequently used platform for research in pediatric and health psychology. However, there is little pragmatic guidance as to ethical best practice of this research. The absence of guidance is particularly prominent for online research with children. Our objective is to outline ethical issues in e-health research with children and adolescents using two exemplar studies in pediatric pain research. Methods The first study is an asynchronous message board discussion amongst teenagers with pain who are frequent internet users.The second study is a web-based behavioral intervention for the management of adolescent pain. Results Each exemplar study is discussed in the context of specific ethical considerations related to recruitment, informed consent and debriefing, privacy and confidentiality, and participant safety. Ethical issues regarding the evaluation of o.Licated by the use of open social media to invite participation.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptCONCLUSIONOverall, results of this study demonstrate a rich phenomenological experience among clinical librarians, with strong emotional reactions illustrating both the joys and the challenges of integration into bedside medical care. The data indicates that the emotional experience of an individual librarian significantly impacts on that librarian’s ability to function effectively in the clinical setting, that training for clinical librarians must address these issues, and that such training must also include specialized subjects and skills. These include medical terminology, but also the clinical culture, politics, and environment. Confidence and attitude can be fostered by effective training and preparation, positive mentoring, and clinical champions (advocates) who provide support during the adjustment period. Such preparation and continued on-the-job support can provide valuable assistance in coping successfully with an environment that is often highly stressful and involves lifeand-death situations.AcknowledgmentsThe authors would like to thank Kathy Moeller, Kathryn Summey, Colleen Kenefick, Robert Tolliver, and Nita Ferree for their contributions and assistance with this study and manuscript. Also, we would like to thank the Research Committee of the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association for their grant funding support of this project. This study was granted expedited approval by the University of Florida Institutional Review Board, protocol #2010-U-1251. This study was supported in part by the NIH/NCATS Clinical and Translational Science Award to the University of Florida, UL1 TR000064. This study was funded in part by the Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association Research Section Award, 2011?012.Med Ref Serv Q. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 January 28.Lyon et al.Page
Case Study: Ethical Guidance for Pediatric e-health Research Using Examples From Pain Research With AdolescentsEllen M. Henderson,1 MSC, Emily F. Law,2 PHD, Tonya M. Palermo,2,3 PHD, and Christopher Eccleston,1 PHDCentre for Pain Research, The University of Bath, 2Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and 3University ofWashington School of MedicineAll correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Prof. Christopher Eccleston, Centre for Pain Research, The University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK. E-mail: c.ecc[email protected] Received February 15, 2012; revisions received May 30, 2012; accepted June 8, 2012 Objective The Internet is a frequently used platform for research in pediatric and health psychology. However, there is little pragmatic guidance as to ethical best practice of this research. The absence of guidance is particularly prominent for online research with children. Our objective is to outline ethical issues in e-health research with children and adolescents using two exemplar studies in pediatric pain research. Methods The first study is an asynchronous message board discussion amongst teenagers with pain who are frequent internet users.The second study is a web-based behavioral intervention for the management of adolescent pain. Results Each exemplar study is discussed in the context of specific ethical considerations related to recruitment, informed consent and debriefing, privacy and confidentiality, and participant safety. Ethical issues regarding the evaluation of o.

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